India Dewar is a London-based multi-media artist who is interested in the fabric of the universe and our complex relationship with it. Her work references the visual metaphors used by scientists to give accessibility to this deeply complex topic. India is particularly interested in this human need to condense and contextualise complex subject-matter.

She says: “When I made these prints I had been reading about string theory and the models of the universe that it purports. The visual metaphor that Brane cosmologists use to convey the shape of the ‘Multiverse’ is a loaf of sliced bread, suggesting that our universe is one of numerous worlds, slabs floating in parallel in a higher dimensional space. Like a slice in a grander cosmic loaf.”  

India also references Camus as an influence, who viewed our need for such metaphors as "man’s futile search for meaning and clarity in the face of an unintelligible world, devoid of God and external truths and value."  There is also an echo here between this human need for order and Salvador Dali’s 'Paranoiac Critical Method'. India says: "this method was a central concern when I developed the idea of prints from bread. It simply puts a name to the common experience of seeing figurative images in an abstract shape. An example would be faces in clouds. We all see something different. In short, our beliefs shape our experience."


Slice of the Multibrane LoaF

We all see something different...our beliefs shape our experience.
Slice no. 1
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Slice no. 5
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Slice no. 3
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Slice no. 7
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Slice no. 4
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Slice no. 8
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These works are created using sliced white bread as a printing tool. India has intricately and subtly hand-painted mountain-ranges over the top, creating an illusionistic effect that makes us question what is the result of the bread and what has been added by the hand of the artist. The beauty and form of a slice of bread often goes unnoticed, here however it is intriguing to see how each slice of bread produces such a varied imprint and displays such structural complexity. On first impression, we may read these as scientific graphs or perhaps just cosmic abstractions. However, once we make he connection to sliced bread, these works become witty commentaries on art, illusion and the universe.